Radio Moscow

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 Radio Moscow logo from 1969.

Radio Moscow was founded in 1929 is the only international radio station of the lot. At its peak it broadcasted in over 70 languages, and all programmes had to pass censorship before they were aired. The station was changed to Voice of Russia in 1993. Check out this article for popular programs and a more in-depth history.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

Radio Orfey

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Radio Orfey has been broadcasting classical music since its founding in 1960 by All Union Radio, and through its existence has had many different owners. It is now owned privately and called Radio Orpheus.

 This is Radio Orphey’s current logo, from their website.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

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Radio Yunost

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Radio Yunost was created by All Union Radio in 1962 and continues to this day. It’s a channel featuring mainly music (domestic and foreign) and targeted towards youth. Today it’s owned by the  Federal State Unitary Enterprise VGTRK, which also owns Radio Mayak.

Radio-yunost-logo.jpg This is the current logo of Radio Yunost.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

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Radio Mayak

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Radio Mayak was established in 1964. It broadcasted news, music, and literature, and in 1980s began featuring advertisements. Fun fact: “Mayak” means “lighthouse” in Russian.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

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All Union First Programme

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The All Union First Programme was the first radio station created by All Union Radio. It primarily broadcasted news and political programmes.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

(All info this week will be from Wikipedia, the article mentioned yesterday.) Image from x

Radio Stations of the Soviet Union

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In the Soviet Union, radio options were limited. The government used radio jamming to block stations from the UK and US so Russians could only receive stations made by or approved by them. The Soviet broadcasting organization was called All-Union Radio and was started in 1924 as Lenin’s “newspaper without paper.”

All-Union Radio had five stations, and we’ll be looking at them this week.

See you tomorrow! –The Daily Blini

info from wikipedia Radio in the Soviet Union